Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Adventure in Central Asia and along the Gold Coast

One of the great things about G.A. Henty's books is that many of them introduce modern readers to some of the more obscure, but deeply interesting military conflicts in history. In Through Three Campaigns: A Story of Chitral, Tirah, and Ashantienty introduces the reader to three distinct military campaigns. The Chitral campaign took place in northwestern Pakistan in 1895. The Tirah campaign took place on the Indian frontier in 1897-98. The Ashanti wars reached a climax in Ghana, Africa in the last decade of the 19th century. The reader will enjoy each of these "books within a book."
When Lisle Bullen’s father is killed in the line of duty, the young man must take full personal responsibility for his life. Too young to enlist, he disguises himself as a native soldier. His exceptional skills and maturity soon find him out. Over the course of three military campaigns, Bullen rises to the rank of Lieutenant in His Majesty’s Rutlandshire regiment. After two successful campaigns in Central Asia, Bullen is sent to Ghana in Africa. Will he survive his third campaign? How will he make his way in the world now that his father has passed away? These questions and more will be answered in G. A. Henty’s Through Three Campaigns: A Story of Chitral, Tirah, and Ashanti.
Set in late nineteenth century England, India, Pakistan, and Ghana, Through Three Campaigns includes more than 110 geographical, historical, and explanatory footnotes to aid the modern reader. The book is available in the Alacrity Press bookstore.

Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Zenobia, Queen of Palmyra

I first learned about Zenobia when I read Gibbon's The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. More recently, the Zenobia's capital city, Palmyra, has been in the news as it has been seized by ISIS and threatened with destruction. 

Zenobia was one of the great female leaders of history and queen of a glorious, if short-lived, empire. She was the wife of King Septimius Odaenathus of the Palmyrene Empire. After his death in 267 A.D., Zenobia seized power. Ovr the next two years she expanded the empire, capturing Egypt and a large part od Anatolia (Turkey). Unfortunatley, her conquests gained the attention of the Roman Empire. William Ware’s classic, Zenobia: The Fall of Palmyra, examines the splendor of the ancient empire and the remarkable lady who made it a reality.

This book is now available in the Alacrity Press Amazon bookstore.

Thursday, July 9, 2015

Jonathan Edward's Sermons.


The Select Sermons of Jonathan Edwards gathers together nineteen of the most well-known sermons by the influential 18th century American Christian preacher. Sermons include the convicting treatises  “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God,” “The Vain Self-Flatteries of the Sinner,” and “The Justice of God in the Damnation of Sinners.” 

It is often assumed that Edwards was simply a hell, fire and brimstone preacher. That simply is not the case. Edwards consistently warned his flock about the danger of sin but also edified and uplifted his congregation with encouraging  sermons such as “Many Mansions,” and “The Excellency of Christ.” These selected sermons feature Edward's wide range of entreaties to his flock.


Alacrity Press is proud to republish this Christian classic that is as relevant today as when it was first published. It is available in the Alacrity Press Amazon store.

Sunday, March 1, 2015

The Witness in the Stars

How did early people know what God expected of them?  In Genesis chapter 4, the Bible states, "The Lord said to Cain, “Why are you angry, and why has your face fallen? If you do well, will you not be accepted? And if you do not do well, sin is crouching at the door. Its desire is for you, but you must rule over it.” Hundreds of years before God gave the Mosaic law, people had an understanding of the moral law. But how was this knowledge transmitted to succeeding generations. Theologian E.W. Bullinger believes that God's plan for mankind was on full display in His creation -- the stars.
E.W. Bullinger was one of the most prolific writers among theologians of the 19th century. His outstanding scholarship resulted in classics such as Number in Scripture. In The Witness of the Stars, Bullinger takes the reader back in time before God had given a written revelation. He asks the question, Did God leave Himself without a witness? Bullinger resoundly answers NO! He then proceeds to show how God declared his sovereignty over creation through the stars in the heavens. Bullinger strips away pagan falsehoods to reveal how the heavens truly proclaim the gospel of Jesus Christ as the only hope of salvation. 
   Communicating via the stars may seem a may seem an odd idea in the modern age. If anything, the stars are associated with idolatrous and futile astrology. Bullinger does not believe that early men tried to tell the future through the stars, but could see the story of God's redemptive plan in the stars. At a time when the world was sparsely populated--relatively speaking and lacking electricity, the night sky would have lit up as a powerful testimony to God's creative and sustaining power.
     Originally published in 1893, Alacrity Press is proud to make this classic book available to our generation. It is available now in the Alacrity Press bookstore. The ISBN-13 is 978-1505784947

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

South Carolina Genealogy

Alacrity Press is proud to publish our first genealogy book. A Thin Black line traces members of a South Carolina family. The book is available now in the Alacrity Press bookstore.

A descendant, of South Carolina natives, Mrs. Highsmith records an amateur tracing of paternal and maternal lines. This book is a first attempt to collate family notes of ancestors who lived in the general vicinity back to, at least, the early 1800s. Plans for a future, more detailed, version is hoped in the years to come. Original research failed to trace the Black family back to Scotland (Lamont, McGregor, McLean of Durat clans) and the Turner/Knighton family to Scotland (at least the Lamont clan) and England.

Paternal lines include the antecedents of the Black and Yount families (The Black family contains antecedents of the Black, Taylor, and Huckaby families in the Union, Buffalo, Gaffney, and Limestone areas of South Carolina, while the Yount family contains antecedents of the Yount, Heck, and Kanipe families from Tennessee and the Union, Gaffney, and Pacolet Mills areas of South Carolina). 

Maternal lines include the antecedents of the Turner, Knighton, Langston, Hopkins, Malone, and Ray families from the Union, Buffalo, Gray Court Owens, and Enoree areas of South Carolina. Be sure to get your copy of A Thin Black Line.


Tuesday, November 11, 2014

First published many decades ago, E.W. Bullinger’s Number in Scripture remains a first-rate scholarly study of the importance of numbers in scripture. Bullinger’s work edifies Christians and challenges cynics by expertly surveying the intricate design and purpose in God’s inspired word. Though the reader will find reading Number in Scripture from cover to cover satisfying, it is in many respects a reference book. Both Bible teachers, preachers, layman, and new Christians will benefit by keeping this book nearby while studying the Bible. 

The book has many interesting lists including, but certainly not limited to the 27 sieges of Jerusalem, the ten times the people shouted for joy, seven weak things in Judges, and seven oak trees. While written in a format resembling entries in an encyclopedia, we are sure you will enjoy reading the book from cover to cover.

The book includes original Greek words and their English equivalents. Hebrew words are rendered in their English equivalent.  Alacrity Press is proud to make available this classic Christian work for today’s generation of believers. It is available now on Amazon and in the Alacrity Press bookstore.

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

The Consolation of Philosophy

Anicius Manlius Severinus Boethius was a 6th century nobleman, politician, and most notably—a philosopher. In his lifetime he saw the fall of the Western Roman Empire and the establishment of the Ostrogoths. He served a year as Consul but eventually came under suspicion of treasonous dealings with the Eastern Roman Empire. King Theodric the Great imprisoned Boethius and eventually executed him. While awaiting his fate in prison Boethius wrote The Consolation of Philosophy, a book about the weighty issues of life. Framed as a dialogue between Boethius and Philosophy (personated by a woman), Boethius discusses inequality and the overruling importance of Providence. Along with his translations of Aristotle and other Greek classics, Boethius’ writings had a profound impact on scholars of the Middle Ages. The book is available now in the Alacrity Press bookstore.